Information

clock has jewelled pallets.  The case is fitted with a rare inches and beat regulation scale which states at the bottom: English inches and a scale of 0 to 12. The clock retains its original steel case mercury pendulum, typical of the type used by Dent.  The clock has a top quality mahogany case with arched top, double door locks and dust seal.  The case has its original finish and lacquer on the back plates. (CL-521) 

 

Reference 1:  Vaudrey Mercer's book on Dent indicates that regulators 517 to 1503 were made between 1840-53. 
Reference II: Mercer, Tony, 'Chronometer Makers of the World', Colchester, Essex: N.A.G. Press Ltd., 1991, pp. 128,129. Edward John Dent was born in 1790 and died in 1853.  Probably the greatest accomplishment of his career was receiving the commission from the Board of Longitude to build a great clock of the Houses of Parliament fondly referred to as 'BIG BEN' and probably the most famous clock in the world.  Dent was in partnership with John Roger Arnold from 1830 to 1840 and set-up on his own in 1840 at 64 Strand.  In 1828, Dent's chronometer No.114 won first prize at the Premium Trials with a variation of 1/2 second in 12 months for which the admiralty awarded a price of L300. Dent's chronometers were used on many explorations in Polar regions and in the Tropics.  Number 1800 was owned by David Livingston during his African travels.  The Royal Warrant was granted in 1841 as 'Chronometer Maker to the Queen and HRH Prince Albert'. Dent was an eleoquent man continually writing to horological and scientific journals and he took out many patents.  Dent trained many of the later great chronometer makers such as Kullberg, Johannsen, and Mercer. 
Condition:  Outstanding. 
Dimensions:  Length 52 1/2 inches; Width 15 5/8 inches; Depth 8 1/2 inches.